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Silas

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  1. When I lived in West Germany in the 1980s, I helped smuggle people from the east to the west. Believe me, you don't want to live in a Communist country.
  2. Any chance all of this (the resignation of Lebanon's prime minister, the missile attack, and the "Night of the Long Knives" sacking and arrests of Saudi ministers) is all connected, and might mean open conflict between Iran and Saudi Arabia might be imminent?
  3. Shia Muslims Strategic Planning

    Russia is only on Russia's side, and would be quite happy to invade and subjugate Iran if that nation fell into anarchy and disorder (after taking Azerbaijan). Putin would set up Iran as a failed puppet state the way the Soviets set up Afghanistan.
  4. Future of Iran nuclear deal

    I would be suspicious of any "studies" or polls that appear in the American media regarding military actions against Iran. I don't know of a single person that supports action against Iran on any level, must less military. The study you posted was conducted by Jews (Sagan who quotes Bernstein) with an agenda. Are there people in the US that are against Iran and want to see military involvement? Sure. But it is a minority. The public has no appetite for further adventures in the Middle East. Does the media treat Iran fairly in the US? Of course not. Who controls the media?
  5. Future of Iran nuclear deal

    Only because the deal was drafted by Obama. They would have denounced it if GW Bush had put it together. It was partisan politics. Israel continues to spread propaganda about Iran, finance and arm ISIS, etc. Obviously, Saudi Arabia is working against Iran as well. In the town I live in, some Shia Muslims wanted to establish a learning center and mosque. Some people in the community objected to this, and tried to use zoning laws and frivolous lawsuits to stop it. I later found out that these were wealthy Jews who didn't want Persians in their neighborhood. They convinced some paranoid Christians to go along with it. Ultimately, the mosque was built after other people in the community rose up to support it.
  6. Future of Iran nuclear deal

    It isn't just the Republicans The Democratic party supports full-scale interventionism in the Middle-East, and is militantly anti-Iran 90%+ Jews in the US are Democrats, and we know how Jews feel about Iran.
  7. Future of Iran nuclear deal

    I don't think the US is going to take any military action against Iran. The American public is overwhelmingly against that, and a vast majority of Americans have no ill-will toward Iranians. Most don't even have an issue with Islam. This effort against the Iranian regime is orchestrated by Israel
  8. It sounds like he enjoys getting some attention from other women, even if he does not mean to actually commit an infidelity, or engage in some kind of affair. As others here have pointed out, is there anything you can do to improve the relationship? Is there something missing that he wants? Have you grown distant from each other? There is no guarantee that he will listen to reason and his faith, but when one is confronted with a large problem or crisis, the first thing he or she should do is figure out what can be done immediately, even if it is something small. Perhaps speak to someone at your mosque, or undertake marriage counseling?
  9. Aside from all the scientific and technical details regarding evolution, there is an argument that can be made that God (Allah) never *stopped* creating--the universe and everything in it, continues to be formed according to His will. Man is in a state of becoming, and is not fixed. Another paradox connected to this has to do with the ancient question of God's omniscience and the fate of man. The philosopher Boethius was asked the following question: if God knows everything we will do, and everything we will become, does it mean that we have no free will, and that we live in a deterministic universe? The answer to that question is that God does not see things the way human beings do: God is supra-temporal, and exists outside of time. Everything that He sees occurs before Him in the flash of immediacy, like light from a lamp filling a room. I think these issues like evolution arise because we put human constraints on God, and apply physical and temporal limitations to what He does.
  10. Aside from all the scientific and technical details regarding evolution, there is an argument that can be made that God (Allah) never *stopped* creating--the universe and everything in it, continues to be formed according to His will. Man is in a state of becoming, and is not fixed. Another paradox connected to this has to do with the ancient question of God's omniscience and the fate of man. The philosopher Boethius was asked the following question: if God knows everything we will do, and everything we will become, does it mean that we have no free will, and that we live in a deterministic universe? The answer to that question is that God does not see things the way human beings do: God is supra-temporal, and exists outside of time. Everything that He sees occurs before Him in the flash of immediacy, like light from a lamp filling a room. I think these issues like evolution arise because we put human constraints on God, and apply physical and temporal limitations to what He does.
  11. Salafism and Sunnism

    I was wondering if the lack of formal hierarchy within Sunni Islam (specifically Salafist/Wahhabist branches) leads to inconsistent theology and even extremism. Unlike the Shia, they do not have Ayatollah al-Uzma, etc. An analogy within Christianity would be the difference between Catholics and Anabaptists, with the latter operating in a free and unconstrained way, with little formal authority. This also gives Anabaptists (protestants) a certain advantage in that they can raise funds, find followers, and set up places of worship, without having to "get permission" so to speak.
  12. I have heard some scholars say that certain passages within the Quran can be interpreted in such a way as to suggest we live in a fatalistic, or deterministic universe. For instance in Surah 6:125 it is written So whoever Allah wants that He guides him - He expands his breast to Islam; and whoever He wants that He lets him go astray He makes his breast tight and constricted as though he (were) climbing into the sky. Thus Allah places the filth on those who (do) not believe. and in 35:8 ...Allah lets go astray whom He wills and guides whom He wills. So (let) not go out your soul for them (in) regrets. Indeed, Allah (is) All-Knower of what they do. I suppose the objection is that this means the sinner is doomed to sin How should we interpret these passages? I suspect there is much more going on here
  13. Afghanistan

    that is the official story, but I suspect it has more with Pakistan, a country that is worried about extremists on its borders. And we have terrorists right here in the US. It is the same group that used to bomb buildings, burn cars, get into shootouts with police, assault people in the streets, and call for violent revolution when I lived in Germany. That group had a few names, but it was all the same people: The Red Army Faction, the Baader-Meinhoff group, or ANTIFA. Marxist atheists and thugs out to burn down church and mosque alike. Terrorism takes a lot of forms, and it isn't just bombs. We have kids in this country that are being brainwashed into thinking they are the opposite sex, and given hormones to stop puberty. In Australia, they are giving 13 year olds sex change operations. Literally ruining their lives for some Cultural Marxist agenda. To me it is terrorism against children. So while we worry about some guys running around with AK-47s in the mountains of Afghanistan, our own country is being corrupted and compromised. We have radical groups like ANTIFA and 3rd wave feminists "partnering" with Sunni Islamist groups to push some agenda involving individual rights, when it is pretty easy to see that the political left is using Muslims for its own ends. These people hate all religion.
  14. I am curious, what are the objections to the teachings of Yasir al Habib ?
  15. 1. Outreach is critical: right now, Sunni groups are trying to claim that they speak for ALL Muslims, of every variety and sect, and this creates problems. Many Americans do not know the theological, social, and historical differences between Shia and Sunni. Shia Muslims need to reach out to their communities and show people how they are refined, sophisticated, peaceful, and a credit to the country. They cannot allow Wahabbists/Salafists, or other Saudi controlled front groups set the narrative--that is a disaster. Here is a good example: a local politician made some controversial remarks about how Arabs coming into her community illegally were utilizing social services, overloading the schools, and gaming the system. A few days later, the Arab Action Network showed up and protested at a council meeting: they were loud and violent, threatening people who were there. They brought with them these ANTIFA thugs you hear about on tv, who vandalized cars and created other problems. This is NOT the way to show the community that Muslims are peaceful, tolerant people who are good neighbors. It reinforces the idea that they are dangerous and insular. Meanwhile, the Shia Muslims in the community were horrified by this. 2. Engage more at the national level, on television, academic conferences, political conferences, etc. --show the public what Shia Islam is all about. Some may object that it is unfair that they have to "prove" that they are peaceful and reliable people, but that is the situation we are in. It is because others are trying to speak for you, and their ideology is not yours.
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