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Hayy ibn Yaqzan

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  1. Art, innovation and religion

    In a certain dimension; this is a very interesting commentary on Taqleed. In many other dimensions, there's plenty to ponder on here. Ahsant.
  2. Allah (S W T) knows what is in your heart Sinan, Allah knows how you struggle and how your mother struggles. Be peace, Be at peace, Go peacefully and walk the halls with peace. The adversary to you is not human, but it's a whisper In the ears of every-one, ready-to-fly-off-the-handle, imploding, laughing. And it's silent. In front of you, it's silent. Not mocking. Because there's nothing to mock. So their words slip right off. Because you're looking at God, and goodness - not listening to the whisper. That's how you know it wants your attention. That's how to know you can starve it of what it craves. In your Patience and Peace is the life of Jihad, In your Eloquence and Speech is a prayer. ~ Bismillah, Ya Fattah,Ya Salaam,Ya Wakeel. Bismillah, Ya Mutakabbir, Ya Jabbaar, Ya Mudhil
  3. An irrelevant Farsi Noha!!! in Ashura

    Wa Alaykum Salaam, Something about the recording, and the nature of the gathering, and the difference in reaction between Shia - has me curious. Is there any way to find a full translation? My full appreciation and thanks if this is possible.
  4. [TRASH PIT]My Conversion To Shiism

    @MuhammadXII This is one of the few instances where I witness someone referring to their journey from Ahle-Sunnah to Shia as a conversion. I can appreciate that there's a feeling of refining one's faith, and moving closer to the Haqq; so many warm wishes, and congratulations on the love, balance and excellence in action that you have found with Imam Ali(a.s) and his progeny. Let's remember though, that while we may have the opinion that Sunni brothers and sisters have been misled and misguided by history - the Qur'an that we both read from, and Allah (swt) whom both parties worship and ask from, and his Rasul Muhammad (saw) - are held in the greatest esteem and shared by both. For this reason, I'm inclined to view your journey as a refinement, and coming closer to a truth that you already recognised, as a Muslim - rather than a conversion, from one totally different belief to another. Alhamdulillah, it's a pleasure to hear your good news brother. A couple of things, that you have made me curious about I wonder, what does this involve? How were you living as a Sunni, and did it stop you or prevent you in a large way from practicing as a Shia? Also know that to follow a Marja, in Taqleed - is not the same concept as pledging allegiance, publicly (or even privately), as one might to an Imam of the Ahlul Bayt, or a trusted Mawla. Perhaps you know this already - but your speech is so admirably passionate, that I wish only to check in with you. May Allah make the path smooth for you, to paradise - by joining you with kindred who recognise his truths - and bestowing us all with the best of Akhlaq, and the will to please him in every action. Ameen. AsSalaamun Alaykum wa Rahmatullahi wa Barakaatu
  5. What if we were all wrong?

    Salaamun Alaykum wa Rahmatullah wa Barakatu. A Marja is a learned scholar, capable of performing Ijtihad and publishing a Risalah as guidance for people to perform Taqleed. There is no obligation or role necessitated for them in Islam, to serve in the state, government or courts. (As far as I am aware; although I can think of some strong arguments for this to be the case) Marja are free to draw scholarly conclusions, hold academic and political differences of opinion and agreements in who they believe is the most learned among them. It is a system based on networks of trust, from the bottom up, as to who the believers decide to listen to among them. The pope is the de facto head of the Holy Roman Catholic Church, and the Vatican State - and there's plenty more to be said about the Pontifex, but I know very little. This information is just based on my own knowledge, and is liable to be faulty - but I hope that it serves you accurately. Please forgive me and correct me, if I have provided misinformation, based on my limited understanding. May we be enlightened about the world, it's many tribes and cultures; its varied opinions in approaching the devotion of Allah (swt), out of his mercy - and for our benefit in pleasing him and drawing near to him. Insha'Allah. Ameen.
  6. What if we were all wrong?

    Not exactly what was asked, but as noted in previous posts, another direction from which to approach truth; Hypothetically, if life turned out to be inconsequential, you may at least give yourself the best experience of it by practising Islam, and looking up to the most wholesome and humane role models; the Ahlul Bayt. And by joining in with the most resilient, varying, rewarding and community-strengthening Role-Play known to history. If not for truth, then for love, or for freedom, or for journeys, or for wisdom, or for justice- Always be returning to the concept of Allah, and always be looking up to those who lived on earth and endorsed him in every single action. The more I dwell on OP's question, the more it seems it is not about Sunni and Shia, and the more it feels like poetry.
  7. What if we were all wrong?

    Allah is wise and merciful, Beneficient and giving without even being asked by us. I can only speak from my own limited understanding- As a Muslim, before anything else, all beliefs fall back on the holy Qur'an, and the divine guarantees laid out, in this protected recitation. (even to get to this point requires a leap of faith in the Qur'ans authenticity, but it's an easy one for me, given Muhammad (SAW)'s character, legacy and the logical and emotional appeal of the Almighty(SWT) and his attributes-) So as long as I am holding fast to the advice and command given in the holy Book, there should be nothing to fear, as one would be ever-striving for and doing good; reflecting on the signs of Allah; molding oneself into being an asset to society, loving, compassionate, learned, wise, humble and fearful of neglecting duty or rememberance. (It can be noted dear Sister, that even by the Qur'an itself, there are individuals, who are not categorised as Muslims, and perform the above - who are told that even they have nothing to fear from Allah.) It is the community that embodies these principles most, that I am inclined to trust with relaying to me, the most likely or authentic version of history, and trusting in their revered personalities and narrations. As far as I can see it - this is the school of thought that believes in the leadership and excellence of Imam Ali (AS), without necessarily denigrating other personalities, without a very firm basis. If it turns out to be completely incorrect with regards to these conclusions; Insha'Allah, there is mercy for those who repent, seek for truth constantly, and respect/act upon any knowledge that has come to them - with a sincere intention to be guided by and please Allah. The high, The most knowledgable, surely knows what's in the hearts of all people. It is not comprehensive, and only scratches the surface, but I hope that this is a useful response for you, Salaamun Alaykum wa Rahmatullah wa Barakatu
  8. Hello - Adele [cover]

    Salaamun Alaykum @The Batman, I am curious for your opinion, or well researched repository of references on this: Where does the boundary of Al-Ghina end, and the edge of Devotional Recitation, Remembrance, Qasida, Nouha, Marthiya, etc. begin? If my understanding is well informed, then one is forbidden, and the other is recommended and beneficial? How do we make the distinction?
  9. I'm having nightmares of all the millions of poor lab-mice, tortured needlessly in the name of Aubrey de Grey. Life is only important if it's human life - is the profound implication in this terrifying vision of the future; because the cost of biological immortality, is the biology we can manipulate, to test our proud theories. Human life is only valuable if it is productive, entertaining and of material benefit - is an inevitable outcome; because self-development, learning and achieving insight is hard, compared to the quick-fix of mis-using gifts from generations gone - who expected us to think long. No matter how rosy it gets spun to you, about how the ends justify the means; Know that the human condition, is still the human condition - and it will always hunger for more. (especially the more you give it). The more it can reach and grasp as a society, the more it will swallow and consume. Except for that wise men, prophets and guides were blessed with insight, and showed us that we can be content and whole and happy without needing ever-more; If only we listened. If only we remembered. This late night beatnik blowback was brought to you by four cups of Chai and a long walk home. Salaam
  10. Sistani vs Khamenei

    @Nataly Insha'Allah, you may be guided and we may all be guided to the best sources of knowledge (and not rely on Wikipedia entirely for explanations - because whilst it is an amazing repository of knowledge, it is not complete or comprehensive). The case and structure of the title "Grand Ayatollah" is a subtle and intricate one - as is the case of what it means to be "Marji". 'Authority' and hierarchy, is also perhaps an oversimplified way to think about the role of an Ayatollah, or any Marja. Especially when referring to them, alongside the holy Quran and the holy prophets. I don't have a well-rounded, convenient definition for you, on what the roles of these various categories are - but they do relate to the concepts of "Ijtihad" and "Taqleed" - which have emerged along the timeline of history in Islam, after the message of RasulAllah Muhammad (S.A.W) passed away, and are very related to "Imamat" - and the belief in divine and scholarly leadership for the Ummah in this world. Do keep researching, and asking questions in good faith and seek out scholars to ask questions from in person - there is an endless amount to learn about and from those with higher knowledge. Salaam, and best wishes on your search for knowledge,
  11. I've been swimming deep, beyond the Edge of Futurism and Utopian speculation - in a professional capacity, for a number of years. For many reasons, by interrogating and investigating these concepts, and drawing certain ethical conclusions - it has built my faith and understanding in the necessity of Islam, as much as its evident truth. Insha'Allah, we might find a full articulation, and good forums by which to address these oncoming topics - in good time. Perhaps ShiaChat is exactly that In the meantime - Keep Iman, and Carry On. also @HumanForLife, do check out @dayanhassan's thread:
  12. Science Fiction

    Salaam Great question, I wrote a wall of text about thoughts on this, for a similar and related topic; I wonder if it's useful at all: May update here, with more specific stuff on Sci-Fi ;)
  13. Wa Alaykum Salaam Wa Rahmatullah Wa Barakaatu Much like others in this thread - it feels like I can empathise with your situation, having felt a very similar way, for such a long time. It's long, lonely and draining. It's a Jihad just to spend time with friends and attend a lecture - where one has to constantly remind oneself of Allah. Something that I noticed inside myself - which may not be the case for you - was a sense of judgement. It snuck up on me silently, so I didn't even realise I was doing it - and thought that it was helping me to become a better Muslim. When I looked around, what I saw was the faults of others, where things were going wrong, how someone else should be using their time, and spending their money, and using their Aql and Akhlaq. I also discovered, that much of this thought process began internally - with how I treated myself. I was using a very basic and incomplete set of criteria to measure myself up as a Muslim. I should stop myself before this begins to sound like one of those get-rich-quick-self-development-pyramid-scheme-adverts "I lived in the gutter, now I'm an entrepreneur! Using this one secret trick..." But in all honesty, the title "mental toughness against society" really caught my eye. Because it evoked that sense of opposition I was feeling again, and the callouses I felt in my soul, numbing me to being able to relate, even with other Muslims, who had clearly good intentions - but I had judged as misguided. Insha'Allah, that stage in my life had some benefits that has left me with some lessons - a vigilance and caution when approaching situations and remembering Allah(swt). But I am glad that I have left it behind also. And I hope for you to grow beyond it, if it is the Haqq ordained by Allah(swt) for you to do so. Because there is much more to Islam, than being perfect. In fact, being perfect isn't even a condition - but this is; striving for good, leaving matters outside of our control to Allah, connecting deeply with community & turning back in Istighfar when we do fall short, as we inevitably will. Brother, I wish you the very best - and would be interested to talk to you further sometime, Know that you have friends who mean well here on ShiaChat, and in your town/city too - striving to be the best Mu'min and Shia they can be. They can learn from you - and you can learn from them. I wish you all the best, and Alhamdulillah - what a great self-reflection you have been granted with. May we be guided by Allah(swt) and his representatives, to the best path, the Sirat al-Mustaqeem. Insha'Allah Salaam P.s. Apologies for the wall of text - Hope it's useful. ^_^
  14. Islamic College London?

    @humanbeing101 Bro - My knowledge on this is limited, but I know enough people connected to the Hawzas in London and Birmingham to be able to say; They are in fact quite open, and welcoming - regardless of what the published student recruitment material might say. There are always some requirements, so that they can make sure you are up for studying and trustworthy - but once you speak to the educational faculty at these institutions, and they know who you are - it becomes less guarded, and less reliant on references I believe. There are also part-time and pre-hawza courses, for those who are still preparing, or cannot yet commit to studying full-time. This might be ideal for you - I think some may even offer a way to study remotely - skyping into classes, fully interactive, but still distance learning. Alhamdulillah, we have a lot of options, and a very supportive community of scholars here in the UK. One of the reasons I joined ShiaChat was that I was investigating whether or not I wanted to enroll at a Hawza course in the UK this year
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