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The Story of ShiaChat.com - The IRC (#Shia) Days!

Ali

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[This will be a series of blog entries on the history of ShiaChat.com; how it was founded, major ups and down, politics and issues behind running such a site and of course, the drama!  I will also provide some feedback on development efforts, new features and future goals and objectives]

Part 1 - The IRC (#Shia) Days!

Sit children, gather around and let me speak to you of tales of times before there was ever high-speed Internet, Wi-Fi, YouTube or Facebook; a time when the Internet was a much different place and 15 year old me was still trying to make sense of it all. 

In the 90s, the Internet was a very different place; no social media, no video streaming and downloading an image used to take anywhere from 5-10 minutes depending on how fast your 14.4k monster-sized dial up modem was.  Of course you also had to be lucky enough for your mom to have the common courtesy not to disconnect you when you’re in the middle of a session; that is if you were privileged enough to have Internet at home and not have to spend hours at school or libraries, or looking for AOL discs with 30 hour free trials..(Breathe... breathe... breathe) -  I digress.

Back in 1998 when Google was still a little computer sitting in Larry Page and Sergey Brin’s basement, I was engaged in armchair jihadi-like debates with our Sunni brothers on an IRC channel called #Shia.  (Ok, a side note here for all you little pups.  This is not read as Hashtag Shia, the correct way of reading this is “Channel Shia”.  The “Hash tag” was a much cooler thing back in the day than the way you young’uns use it today).

For those of you who don’t know what IRC was (or is... as it still exists), it stands for Internet Relay Chat, which are servers available that you could host chat rooms in and connect through a client.  It was like the Wild West where anyone can go and “found” their own channel (chat room), become an operator and reign down their god-like dictator powers upon the minions that were to join as member of their chat room.  Luckily, #Shia had already been established for a few years before by a couple of brothers I met from Toronto, Canada (Hussain A. and Mohammed H.).  Young and eager, I quickly rose up the ranks to become a moderator (@Ali) and the chatroom quickly became an important part of my adolescent years.  I learned everything I knew from that channel and met some of the most incredible people.  Needless to say, I spent hours and dedicated a good portion of my life on the chatroom; of course the alternate was school and work but that was just boring to a 15 year old.

In the 90’s, creating a website was just starting to be cool so I volunteered to create a website for #Shia to advertise our services, who we are, what we do as well as have a list of moderators and administrators that have volunteered to maintain #Shia.  As a result, #Shia’s first website was hosted on a friend’s server under the URL http://786-110.co.uk/shia/ - yes, ShiaChat.com as a domain did not exist yet – was too expensive for my taste so we piggy backed on one of our member’s servers and domain name.

The channel quickly became popular, so popular that we sometimes outnumbered our nemesis, #Islam.  As a result, our moderator team was growing as well and we needed a website with an application that would help us manage our chatroom in a more efficient style.  Being a global channel, it was very hard to do “shift transfers” and knowledge transfers between moderators as the typical nature of a chatroom is the fact that when a word is typed, its posted and its gone after a few seconds – this quickly became a pain point for us trying to maintain a list of offenders to keep an eye out for and have it all maintained in a historical, easily accessible way.

A thought occurred to me.  Why not start a “forum” for the moderators to use?  The concept of “forums” or discussion boards was new to the Internet – it was the seed of what we call social media today.  The concept of having a chat-style discussion be forever hosted online and be available for everyone to view and respond to at anytime from anywhere was extremely well welcomed by the Internet users.  I don’t recall what software or service I initially used to set that forum up, but I did – with absolutely no knowledge that the forum I just setup was a tiny little acorn that would one day be the oak tree that is ShiaChat.com.

[More to follow, Part 2..]

So who here is still around from the good old #Shia IRC days?

 

 

 



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First time viewing the Blog channel on SC, first blog read, what a treat!!!

I had wondered but never did ask about the becoming of shiachat.com. Now I know.

I think in my teens I did manage to get on MIRC. Is that the same as IRC?

Back then, I don't think I paid any interest in chatrooms with religion affiliations, maybe I just never came across any (not that I was looking). MIRC was a brief encounter, somewhat on-&-off until I discovered Yahoo Chat (some years later). Had great moments but the overall experience was hijacked in public chat rooms with bots filling up the screen, mic snog hoggers robbing the voice of reason and deliberate third-party tool hacks which would lead to booting users. Worst part of it was the people who were active in these rooms, many vulgar lunatics and socially deprived rude mega-maniacs, not excluding the perverts!

Eventually I became a yahoo defect, packed it in. Right there, in the middle of the storm,  a light at the end of the tunnel, I discovered my redemption - ShiaChat.com. Today I met my redeemer, Bro Ali, thank you for this great initiative and may it grow, in fact out-grow all of us :)

 

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Salaamalikum,

:'(( Wow. Jazakallah for this post. I feel so old now. I joined 2010 But I think I knew about Shiachat before then. I don't know. 

I miss lots of the old members so much! :'( I guess we all have to move on with our lives though. 

Anyways, Inshallah it continues as a success dear Brother. :')

Best Regards

-Asad_127 

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Wow, I remember my IRC days. I feel old now. Just look at us Ali, just on this platform we've been on since 2002. I think at this point we can compare and see who has more gray hairs.

 

 

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OMG those days were so good. I have used IRC but never knew about shia chatroom. May be i have come across it but don't remember. I was not crazy about chatrooms. :D but i miss those days. Why do we grow up?

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